More Free Firearms Ebooks and Videos

I’m still here. 🙂 Here are more free films and Ebooks, ye gun nuts! 😀

These FREE films (courtesy of the United States government and the folks at Archive.org) are about guns, weaponry, etc. Most of these are gov’t films so your tax dollars already paid for them; you can watch them online or download each movie for viewing later on.

Here’s how to download: on each video’s page you’ll see a menu on the left hand side. Right-click your mouse on the link and choose SAVE AS to download it. MPEG4 (.MP4) is the most popular of the file types:

Archive.org Screen Shot

After this list of videos there’s a 2nd (get it?) list of links to 100+ free E-Books & military manuals at the Archive.org Ebook and Texts Archive.

(Materials made by the gov’t or FOR the gov’t like films and manuals, books, etc are Public Domain in the USA; someone had asked about that….)

  1. Close Combat Firing 1943 U.S. Army Film Bulletin #44: Close Combat Firing
  2. Come and Take It – The Banned TV Commercial
  3. DEFCAD Printable Guns, Frames, and Accessories – Grand Archive 15 Jan 2013
  4. Hand To Hand Combat In Three Parts 1942 Navy training film.
  5. The History of Gun Control
  6. No Guns For Jews The anti-Semitic roots of gun control. By Jews For the Preservation of Firearms Ownership (JPFO)
  7. No Guns For Negroes The racist roots of gun control. By Jews For the Preservation of Firearms Ownership (JPFO)

Here are 50+ MORE arms-related e-books for FREE download at Archive.org (which I’m not affiliated with, by the way). There’s a menu on the left-side for each of these book’s webpages. If you click on a link for one of the e-book formats (like for Kindle), it creates the file on-the-fly so be patient when downloading.

If you find one you like, why don’t you leave a review & that will help another poor, gun-and-religion-clinging poor unfortunate American to find it in the future. 😀

More Free Firearms E-Books:

  1. Firing Regulations For Small Arms 1889 Blunt, Stanhope E. “This document covers the course of instruction for training soldiers in use, knowledge, and accuracy of rifle and carbine firing for effectiveness in battle.”
  2. FM 5-20A Camouflage of Individuals and Infantry Weapons 1944: War Department field manual, Corps of Engineers, camouflage of individuals and infantry weapons. (OBSOLETE) “Parts of this FM include helmet camouflage, skin tonedown, canvas equipment, blending with one’s background, shadows, movement, foxholes, machine guns, mortars, antitank guns, etc.”
  3. FM 7-5 The Rifle Battalion FM 7-5: Infantry field manual, organization and tactics of infantry, the rifle battalion. (OBSOLETE) 1940 “Chapters in this infantry field manual include: infantry characteristics and organization (moral qualities, leadership, training, means of combat); combat (basic factors of infantry combat, offensive and defensive combat, special phases of operations); liaison with other arms (artillery, aviation, cavalry, engineers, chemical troops); and infantry units (individual infantry soldier, rifle units, heavy weapons company units, rifle battalion).”
  4. FM 7-10 Rifle Company, Rifle Regiment 1942 Infantry field manual, rifle company, rifle regiment. (OBSOLETE) “FM 7-10 1942 provides information about offensive combat, defensive combat, security missions, the rifle platoon, rifle squad, weapons platoon, administration, signal communication system, and has appendixes on individual protection and directives for tactical training of the rifle company.”
  5. FM 7-11 Rifle Company, Infantry, Airborne Infantry and Mechanized Infantry 1962-01-16 “This manual provides guidance on the tactical employment of the rifle company, infantry, airborne infantry, and mechanized infantry battalions.”
  6. FM 7-15 Rifle Platoon and Squads: Infantry, Airborne and Mechanized 1965-03-10 “This manual provides doctrinal guidance on the organization and tactical employment of each rifle platoon and squad organic to the infantry, airborne, and mechanized rifle company.”
  7. FM 7-20 Rifle Battalion 1942: Infantry field manual, rifle battalion. (OBSOLETE) “This field manual gives information on the battalion commander and staff, battalion headquarters company, battalion medical section, administration, troop movements and security on the march, bivouacs, the offensive, defense, retrograde movements, and appendixes on directives for the tactical training of rifle battalion and antitank platoon of battalion headquarters company.”
  8. FM 7-35 Antitank Company, Rifle Regiment 1941: Infantry field manual, antitank company, rifle regiment.(OBSOLETE) “Table of contents: doctrine; characteristics of 37-mm gun and gun positions; antitank gun squad; rifle squad; antitank gun section; antitank gun platoon; antitank gun company; and ammunition.”
  9. FM 7-40 Rifle Regiment 1942: Infantry field manual, rifle regiment. (OBSOLETE) “This manual deals primarily with the tactical employment of the infantry rifle regiment. The instructions are also applicable in many respects to other types of infantry regiments. The procedures indicated in this manual should be considered as guides and not as fixed methods; this manual should be studied in conjunction with FM 100-5 and FM 7-5. This document provides information on the regimental commander, regimental headquarters and staff, troop movements and bivouacs, the offensive, defense, and retrograde movements.”
  10. FM 17-5 Armored Force Field Manual, Armored Force Drill 1943 “The purpose of drill is to teach control, discipline, and teamwork. Drill may take the form of dismounted movements on a parade ground, or it may consist of combat exercises and crew drills in the field. This field manual provides information on individual instruction (special instruction for occupants of vehicles), mounted drill, platoon and company formations, and ceremonies and inspections (reviews, parades, escorts).”
  11. FM 17-15 Combat Practice Firing, Armored Force Units 1942: Armored force field manual, combat practice firing, armored force units. (OBSOLETE) “Combat practice firing is that form of training wherein tactical units solve a problem involving a tactical situation or a series of tactical situations in which service ammunition is fired at targets representing an enemy. This field manuals details information on tank units, rifle/machine gun/mortar units, the assault gun, reconnaissance platoon of the armored reconnaissance company, and an appendix regarding an umpire’s checklist and a form for a combat problem.”
  12. FM 21-75 Combat Skills of the Soldier 1984-08-03 “This is the soldier’s field manual. It tells the soldier how to perform the combat skills needed to survive on the battlefield. These are basic skills that must be learned by soldiers in all military occupational specialties (MOS).
  13. FM 21-75 Scouting, Patrolling and Sniping 1944-02-06 “A scout is a soldier employed in reconnoitering under conditions which require exceptional ability in the use of arms, ground and cover, in movement, in observing, and in accurately reporting the results of his observation. Scouts usually operate in pairs.”
  14. FM 21-150 Unarmed Defense for The American Solider 1942-06-30 “The object of this training is to develop the soldier in the art of unarmed self-defense, and to improve his skill in the use of his basic weapons, through speeded reflexes. Confidence in his own ability unarmed, like confidence in his weapons, makes a man a better soldier.”
  15. FM 23-5 U.S. rifle, caliber .30, M1 1965 “This manual is a guide for commanders and instructors in presenting instruction and training in the mechanical operation of the Ml rifle. It includes a detailed description of the rifle and its general characteristics; procedures for disassembly and assembly; methods of loading; an explanation of functioning; a discussion of stoppages and immediate action; a description of the ammunition; and instructions on the care and cleaning of both the weapon and ammunition. The material presented is applicable, without modification, to both nuclear and nonnuclear warfare.”
  16. FM 23-5 U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, M1 1940-07-20 “The rifle must be kept clean and free from dirt and properly lubricated with lubricating grease. To obtain its maximum efficiency the following points must be observed….”
  17. FM 23-6 Basic field manual, U.S. rifle, caliber .30, M1917 (Enfield). (OBSOLETE) 1942 “This field manual on the M1917 (Enfield) provides information on mechanical training, marksmanship (known-distance targets, moving ground targets and air targets), technique of rifle fire, and advice to instructors.”
  18. FM 23-7 U.S. Carbine, Caliber .30, M1 1942-05-20 “The U. S. carbine, caliber .30, Ml, is a self-loading shoulder weapon (see fig. 1). It is gas operated, magazine fed, and air cooled. It weighs approximately 5 pounds. The weapon is fed from a box type magazine having a capacity of 15 rounds.”
  19. FM 23-8 U.S. Rifle 7.62-MM, M14 1962-08-15 “This manual is a guide for commanders and instructors in presenting instruction and training in the mechanical operation of the M14 rifle. It includes a detailed description of the rifle and its general characteristics; procedures for detailed disassembly and assembly; an explanation of functioning; a discussion of the types of stoppages and the immediate action applied to reduce them; a description of the ammunition used; and instructions on the care, cleaning, and handling of both the weapon and ammunition.”
  20. FM 23-8 U.S. Rifle 7.62-MM, M14 1965-05-07 “This manual is a guide for commanders and instructors in presenting instruction in the mechanical operation of the M14 and M14E2 rifles. It includes a detailed description of the rifle and its general characteristics; procedures for detailed disassembly and assembly; an explanation of functioning; a discussion of the types of stoppages and the immediate action applied to reduce them; a description of the ammunition; and instructions on the care, cleaning, and handling of each weapon and its ammunition.”
  21. FM 23-9 Rifle Marksmanship: M16A1, M16A2/3, M16A4 and M4 Carbine 2006-09-13 “This manual provides guidance for planning and executing training on the 5.56-mm M16-series rifle (M16A1/A2/A3/A4) and M4 carbine. It is a guide for commanders, leaders, and instructors to develop training programs, plans, and lessons that meet the objectives or intent of the United States Army rifle marksmanship program and FM 7-0 (Training the Force). This manual is organized to lead the trainer through the material needed to conduct training during initial entry training (IET) and unit sustainment training. Preliminary subjects include discussion on the weapons’ capabilities, mechanical training, and the fundamentals and principles of rifle marksmanship. Live-fire applications are scheduled after the soldier has demonstrated preliminary skills.”
  22. FM 23-10 U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, M1903 1940-01-02 “The care and cleaning of the rifle is an important duty to be performed by all soldiers armed with this weapon, and the subject merits the serious consideration of all officers. Experience has shown that the majority of rifles become unserviceable not through shooting but through the lack of intelligent and proper care. In cleaning, the use of abrasives or other harmful materials is forbidden.”
  23. FM 23-10 U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, M1903 1943-09-30 “The U. S. rifles, caliber .30, M1903, M1903A1, M1903A3, and M1903A4 are breech-loading magazine rifles of the bolt type. They are popularly referred to as Springfield rifles (figs. 1, 3, and 4) . The M1903, M1903A1, and M1903A3 weigh approximately 8.69 pounds each. The M1903A4 weighs approximately 9.69 pounds. The bayonet weighs an additional pound. The ammunition is loaded in clips of five rounds. Ammunition bandoleers for these rifles have six pockets with a total capacity of 60 rounds.”
  24. FM 23-11 90-MM Recoilless Rifle, M67 1965-07-06 “This manual provides information for training personnel to operate the 90mm recoilless rifle. It includes mechanical training, fire control instruments, spare parts and equipment maintenance, ammunition and fuzes, crew drill marksmanship, technique of fire, and advice to instructors concerning the weapon. The material presented herein is applicable to nuclear and nonnuclear warfare.”
  25. FM 23-12 Technique of Fire of the Rifle Squad and Tactical Applications 1963-05-27 “This manual is a guide for training in the principles and methods of training in technique of fire of the rifle squad. It covers fundamentals of daytime technique of fire, field and landscape target firing, technique of fire during periods of limited visibility, and the tactical application of technique of fire. It also includes a description of the training aids, targets, training devices, and range facilities required for this training, and suggests methods of presenting the instruction.”
  26. FM 23-15 Browning Automatic Rifle, Caliber .30, M1918A2 1943-06-30 “The Browning automatic rifle, caliber .30, M1918A2, is an air-cooled, gas-operated, magazine-fed shoulder weapon with bipod (flg. 1). It weighs approximately 20 pounds with sling. The ammunition is loaded in magazines of 20 rounds. The weight of the magazine when empty is 7 ounces; when filled, 1 pound 7 ounces.”
  27. FM 23-15 Basic field manual, Browning automatic rifle, caliber .30, M1918A2, with bipod. (Obsolete) 1940 “This field manual details mechanical training, marksmanship (known distance targets, moving ground targets, and air targets), technique of fire, and advice to instructors for the Browning automatic rifle.”
  28. FM 23-20 Browning Automatic Rifle, Caliber .30 M1918A2, Without Bipod 1940-10-01 “The Browning automatic rifle, caliber .30, M1918, without bipod, is an air-cooled, gas-operated, magazine-fed, shoulder weapon. (See fig. 1.) It weighs 15 pounds 14 ounces. The ammunition is loaded in magazines of 20 rounds each. The weight of the magazine when empty is 7 ounces; when filled, 1 pound 7 ounces. The design permits semiautomatic and automatic fire.”
  29. FM 23-25 Bayonet M1905 1940-01-02 “1. Introduction. a. A well-disciplined enemy will not be driven from his position by fire alone. Making full use of cover and concealment, he will remain in his position until driven out in hand-to-hand combat. The rifle equipped with the bayonet employed skilfully and aggressively is a most effective weapon with which to drive the enemy from his position.”
  30. FM 23-25 Bayonet 1943-09-07 “The will to meet and destroy the enemy in hand-to-hand combat is the spirit of the bayonet. It springs from the fighter’s confidence, courage, and grim determination, and is the result of vigorous training. Through training, the fighting instinct of the individual soldier is developed to the highest point. The will to use the bayonet first appears in the trainee when he begins to handle it with facility, and increases as his confidence grows. The full development of his physical prowess and complete confidence in his weapon culminates in the final expression of the spirit of the bayonet — fierce and relentless destruction of the enemy. For the enemy, demoralizing fear of the bayonet is added to the destructive power of every bomb, shell, bullet, and grenade which supports and precedes the bayonet attack.”
  31. FM 23-35 Combat Training With Pistols & Revolvers 1960-07-23 “This manual is in three parts and explains how to disassemble, assemble, fire, and take care of the Pistols, Automatic, Caliber .45, M1911 and M1911A1, and the revolver, Colt, Caliber .38, 2-Inch Barrel, Detective Special. It describes the parts and explains how they work. The step-by-step arrangement of the text provides for progressive training, promotes learning, and aids in organizing and presenting instruction.”
  32. FM 23-35 Combat Training With Pistols & Revolvers 1988-10-03 “This manual provides guidance on the operation and marksmanship of the pistol, M9, 9-mm; pistol, M1911A1, caliber .45; and the revolver, caliber .38. It reflects current Army standards in weapons qualifications. It is a guide for the instructor to develop training programs, plans, and lessons that meet the objectives of the United States Army Marksmanship program for developing combat effective marksmen. The soldier develops confidence, knowledge, and skills by following the guidelines in this manual.”
  33. FM 23-36 Revolver, Colt, Caliber .45, M1917 and Revolver, Smith and Wesson, Caliber .45, M1917 1941-10-20 “The Colt revolver, caliber .45, M1917, and the Smith and Wesson revolver, caliber .45. M1917, are single shot, breech loading hand weapons. Each Is provided with a cylinder having six chambers arranged about a central axis so that six shots may be fired before reloading is necessary. Both weapons may be fired either single action or double action. Single and double action for these revolvers is described in detail in section IV.”
  34. FM 23-45 Basic Field Manual Browning Machine Gun, Caliber .30, HB M1919A4 Ground 1940 “The machine gun, caliber .30, M1919A4, is recoil operated, belt fed, and air cooled. In recoil operation the rearward force of the expanding powder gas (kick) furnishes the operating energy. The moving parts, while locked together at the moment of the explosion, are left free within the receiver to be forced to the rear by the recoil. This movement is controlled by means of various springs, cams, and levers, and is utilized to perform the necessary mechanical operations of unlocking the breech, extraction and ejection of the empty case, and feeding in of the new round, as well as cocking, locking, and firing the mechanism. (See fig. 1.) The receiver mechanism is for all practical purposes the receiver of the Browning machine gun, M1917.”
  35. FM 23-65 Browning machine gun, caliber.50 HB, M2 2002 “This manual provides technical information, training techniques, and guidance on the caliber.50 HB machine gun, M2. Unit leaders and designated gunners will use this information to successfully integrate the weapon into combat operations. They can instruct on the range or at concurrent training stations. The material applies as is to both nuclear and conventional warfare.”
  36. FM 23-71 Rife Marksmanship 1964-07-27 “This manual provides training guidance in developing and maintaining the rifle marksmanship proficiency of the individual soldier and is applicable to both nuclear and nonnuclear warfare.”
  37. Hand to Hand Combat for Amphibious Scouts 1945-08-01 Training Aids Office For Amphibious Scouts, Ft. Pierce, Florida Ju-Jitsu training handbook for U.S. Navy special forces teams.
  38. MCRP 3-01A Rifle Marksmanship 2001-03-29 “Every Marine is first and foremost a rifleman. MCRP 3-01 A reflects this ethos and the Marine Corps’ warfighting philosophy. This publication discusses the individual skills required for effective rifle marksmanship and standardizes the techniques and procedures used throughout the Marine Corps. It constitutes the doctrinal basis for all entry-level and sustainment-level rifle marksmanship training.”
  39. MCRP 3-01B Pistol Marksmanship 2003-11-29 “Marines must have the versatility, flexibility, and skills to deal with any situation at any level of intensity across the entire range of military operations. Whenever the situation warrants the application of deadly force, a Marine must be able to deliver well-aimed shots to eliminate the threat. A Marine who is proficient in pistol marksmanship handles this challenge without escalating the level of violence or causing unnecessary collateral damage. It is not enough to simply provide Marines with the best available firearms; we must also ensure that their training prepares them to deliver accurate fire against the ene- my under the most adverse conditions without hesitancy, fear, or uncertainty of action. A well-trained Marine is confident that he can protect himself, accomplish the mission, and protect his fellow Marines. To be combat ready, a Marine must be skilled in the tactics, techniques, and procedures of pistol marksmanship and diligent in the proper care and maintenance of the M9, 9-mm service pistol.”
  40. PAM 23-2 Hits Count 1955-03-18 “This is a book on rifle marksmanship instruction, written especially for the instructor and coach. It presents the techniques of good marksmanship training – many of which you have already learned and practiced – in one convenient package and in a manner that you can use in your own classes. It tells you how to teach rifle marksmanship correctly, simply, and in the most effective way the Infantry has been able to devise. It also tells you why we teach marksmanship the way we do. This book can also help the ambitious beginner who is willing to spend some of his spare time mastering the principles that will make his dry and wet practice payoff faster in hits that count.”
  41. Simple Sabotage Field Manual, Strategic Services, (Provisional) January 17, 1944. “This information is to characterize simple sabotage, to outline its possible effects, and to present suggestions for inciting and executing it.”
  42. TM 3-378 Manifold, portable flame thrower, E4 1945-03-03 “This Technical Manual is published to inform and guide personnel to whom the manifold, portable flame thrower, E4 is issued….it includes part one, introduction; part two, operating instructions; part three, maintenance instructions; and part four, auxiliary equipment. Storage and shipping information and a list of references are given in the appendix.”
  43. TM 9-2200 Small Arms, Light Field Mortars, and 20-mm Aircraft Guns 1943 “This manual is a compilation of the outstanding numerical data of the weapons, mounts, ammunition, and miscellaneous equipment which come under the jurisdiction of the Small Arms branches of the Ordnance Department.”
  44. TM 9-206 Browning Machine Gun, Cal. .30, M1919A6 1943-09-01 “This manual is intended to provide information about new materiel. It contains instructions required by the using arms for the identification, use, and care of the Browning Machine Gun, cal. .30, M1919A6. These instructions are supplementary to those given in Field Manual 23-45.”
  45. TM 9-270 U.S. Rifle, Cal. .30, M1903A4 (Sniper’s) Characteristics and Operation, and Use of Telescopic 1943-09-28 “At this time the Weaver telescopic sight No. 330 C is being mounted to the U. S. Rifle, cal. .30 M1903A4, for use of snipers in the field. A Lyman “Alaskan” type telescopic sight will be used as an alternate, but as details are not available it is not covered in this manual.”
  46. TM 9-280 Caliber .22 Rifles, All Types 1944-03-16 “This manual is published for the information of the using arms and services. It contains a description of the cal. .22 target rifles, as well as technical information required for the identification, use, and care of the materiel. The rifles covered include the following…”
  47. TM 9-285 Shotguns, All Types 1942-09-21 “This manual contains in brief the available information necessary for the identification, operation, care, and cleaning of the shotguns listed below. In addition is included the disassembly and assembly of the guns for the purpose of cleaning and lubrication, and available information on ammunition.”
  48. TM 9-1005-206-12 Caliber .22 Rifle M13: Remington Rifle M513T, Stevens Rifle M416-2T, and Winchester Rifle M75T 1958-07-15 Full title: Operation and Organizational Maintenance, Caliber .22 Rifle M13: Remington Rifle M513T, Stevens Rifle M416-2T, and Winchester Rifle M75T “In general, the prescribed organizational maintenance responsibilities will apply as reflected in the appropriate columns of the current Department of the Army Supply Manual ORD 7 SNL B-25 and in accordance with the extent of disassembly prescribed in this technical manual for the purpose of cleaning, lubricating or replacing parts. In all cases, where the nature of repair, modification, or adjustment is beyond the scope or facilities of the using organization, the supporting ordnance maintenance unit should be informed in order that trained personnel with suitable tools and equipment may be provided or other instructions issued.”
  49. TM 9-1005-208-35 Rifle Caliber .30 Automatic Browning M1918A2 1964-09-22 Full title: TM9-1005-208-35 Direct and General Support and Depot Maintenance Manual Rifle Caliber .30 Automatic Browning M1918A2 “This manual contains description of and procedures for removal, disassembly, inspection, repair, assembly and installation of groups and assemblies of the caliber .30 Browning automatic rifle M1918-A2. The appendix contains a list of current references, including supply manuals, technical manuals, and other available publications applicable to the materiel. The maintenance allocation chart is contained in TM9-1005-208-12P.TM 9-1005-208-35 P contains a list of repair parts and special tools for direct and general support and depot maintenance.”
  50. TM 9-1005-211-35 Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 1968-04-04 Full title: Direct Support, General Support,and Depot Maintenance Manual Including Repair Parts and Special Tool List PISTOL, CALIBER .45, AUTOMATIC: M1911A1,WITH HOLSTER, HIP, W/E(1005-473-7905) PISTOL, CALIBER .45, AUTOMATIC: M1911A1,WITH HOLSTER, SHOULDER, W/E (1005-561-2003) “These instructions are in accordance with the MAC and are published for the use of direct support, general support, and depot maintenance personnel maintaining the Caliber .45, Automatic, Pistol M1911A1. They provide information on the maintenance of the equipment which is beyond the scope of the tools, equipment, personnel or supplies normally available to operator’s and organizational maintenance.”
  51. TM 9-1005-222-12 Rifle, Caliber .30 M1, M1C (Sniper’s) and M1D (Sniper’s) 1969-03-17 “These instructions are for use by the operator and organizational maintenance personnel. They apply to Caliber .30 Rifles, M1, M1C (Sniper’s) and M1D (Sniper’s).”
  52. TM 9-1005-222-12P/1 Caliber .30 Rifle M1 (National Match) 1961-07-28 Full title: Operator’s and Organizational Maintenance Manual Including Repair Parts and Special Tools Lists: Rifle M1 (National Match) “This manual is a list of items authorized for operator and organizational maintenance for caliber .30 US rifle M1 (National Match).”
  53. TM 9-1005-223-20 Rifles, 7.62mm, M14 M14A1, Bipod, Rifle, M2 1967-05-1 Full title: Organizational Maintenance Manual Including Basic Issue Items List and Organizational Repair Parts and Special Tool List Rifles, 7.62mm, M14 M14A1, Bipod, Rifle, M29 “This manual contains instructions for the operation and organizational maintenance of 7.62-MM Rifles M14, M14A1, and Rifle Bipod M2 as prescribed by the MAC.”
  54. TM 9-1215 Ordnance Maintenance: Thompson Submachine Gun cal .45, M1928A1 1942-03-01 “This manual is published for the information and guidance of ordnance maintenance personnel. It contains detailed instructions for inspection, disassembly, assembly, maintenance, and repair of the Thompson submachine gun, cal.45. M1D28A1, supplementary to those in the Field mid Technical Manuals prepared for the using arm. Additional descriptive matter and illustrations are included to aid in providing a complete working knowledge of the materiel.”
  55. TM 9-1270 Ordnance Maintenance: U.S. Rifles, cal. .30, M1903, M1903A1, M1903A3 and M1903A4 1944 “This Technical Manual is published for the information and guidance of ordnance maintenance personnel. It contains detailed instructions for disassembly, assembly, inspection, maintenance, and repair of the materiel listed below. Additional descriptive matter and illustrations are included to aid in providing a complete working knowledge of the materiel. These instructions are supplementary to those in Field Manuals and Technical Manuals prepared for the using arms.”
  56. TM 9-1295 Ordnance Maintenance: Pistols and Revolvers 1941-12-29 “This manual is published for the information and guidance of ordnance maintenance personnel. It contains instructions for inspection disassembly, assembly, maintenance and repair of the automatic pistol, cal.45, Ml911 and M1911A1; Colt revolver, cal.45 M1917; and Smith and Wesson revolver, cal.45, M1917, supplementary to the information contained in the references of paragraph 9. Additional descriptive matter and illustrations are included to aid in providing a complete working knowledge of the materiel.”
  57. TM 9-1900 Ammunition, General 1945-06-18 “This manual is published for the information and guidance of Army personnel concerned with ammunition. Those handling ammunition should become familiar with its provisions.”
  58. TM 9-1904 Ammunition Inspection Guide 1944-03-02 “It is necessary for the ammunition inspector to have a wide and complete knowledge of all the types of ammunition that he will come in contact with in the line of duty, for he will be called on to pass judgment as to the safe conduct of various operations. To do this, he must know all the facts about the material in question. It might be well to point out that all ammunition is inherently dangerous, for its whole purpose of existence is to destroy or kill, but, if handled correctly and carefully one need not be afraid to work with it.”
  59. TM 9-2005 Ordnance Materiel – General, Volume 3: Infantry and Cavalry Accompanying Weapons Field Artillery (Obsolete) 1942-12 “This chapter deals with mortars, minor-caliber cannon, and antitank materiel. These are the weapons which are provided to augment the fire of rifles and machine guns.”
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: